Shrimp or Tilapia Ceviche with Coconut Water

Today, 6/30/13, I used the same exact method to make the tilapia ceviche (see below the line) except this time I used shrimp. I preferred the shrimp to the tilapia. But the shrimp as a little too firm. Next time I may leave it in the lime juice only until it turns all the way orange (cooked) instead of letting it marinate in the citrus overnight.

Also, I added a litte extra firm tofu and loved it in there!

This recipe is a keeper. I couldn’t make anything better about it i don’t think.

Oh, I used some sweet potato corn chips from trader joes this time instead of from the regular grocery store. I usually love everything at Trader Joe’s but I didn’t love these. They tasted kind of burnt. What I did like about them is that they werent as sweet as the other brand. Note to self: I will have to find out what the other brand was.

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Last week, I came up with this recipe for tilapia ceviche.

So impressed with nouveau Peruvian style ceviche on a recent trip to Miami, I decided to revisit trying to make ceviche. I tried a couple of times in the past and it was disastrous. Firstly, never use fake crab in ceviche. Secondly, never use frozen seafood either.

While I was in Miami, my friend and I tried every ceviche on the menu at a little carryout called “My Ceviche” http://www.myceviche.com/. They served their ceviche with a side of delicious spicy popcorn that I want to try and replicate as well.

When I started doing my research, I concluded that they style of ceviche leaned toward Peruvian as opposed to Mexican (which dominates in Southern California). A telltale sign that it’s Peruvian was that it had a small piece of corn on the cob and a peice of a sweet potato in it. It also didn’t have a tomato-cocktail type of sauce which is more Mexican,

I used 2 pieces of Tilapia to make the Ceviche. I’ll try shrimp next time and if I use any fish I’ll be sure to make sure that the seafood in it is at least half shrimp. I like the firmness and texture of shrimp versus fish.

Here’s how I made the ceviche:

I cut the fish into small pieces, put it in a big bowl and salted it. I juiced fresh limes over the fish until the lime juice covered the fish. I used a lime/lemon press thing (u can buy very inexpensive at a latin grocery store) to press the limes. I covered the fish and put it in the fridge overnight. The next day, I drained off the lime juice and added about 16 – 20 ounces of unsweetened pure coconut water.

I sliced some fresh ginger 8 – 10 thin peels and/or pieces combined, half a small cucumber, 1/3 of a red onion, and 2-3 mexican onions, 1/2 of a large serrano chile minced, half of a large avocado sliced, some springs of broken up cilantro, and kernals of corn shaven off one cobb (do not overcook). It was suggested to me that the fresh ingredients should be added last (or upon serving). I concluded that this is good advice so that the veggies don’t continue “cooking” in the citrusy juice. It’s special plus if the veggies are bright, fresh, and on the crisp side while retaining quite a bit of their natural flavor (as opposed to a “marinated” flavor.

I served my ceviche with sweet potato corn chips.

 

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20130627-135301.jpg

So impressed with nouveau Peruvian style ceviche on a recent trip to Miami, I decided to revisit trying to make ceviche. I tried a couple of times in the past and it was disastrous. Firstly, never use fake crab in ceviche. Secondly, never use frozen seafood either.

While I was in Miami, my friend and I tried every ceviche on the menu at a little carryout called “My Ceviche” http://www.myceviche.com/. They served their ceviche with a side of delicious spicy popcorn that I want to try and replicate as well.

When I started doing my research, I concluded that they style of ceviche leaned toward Peruvian as opposed to Mexican (which dominates in Southern California). A telltale sign that it’s Peruvian was that it had a small piece of corn on the cob and a peice of a sweet potato in it. It also didn’t have a tomato-cocktail type of sauce which is more Mexican,

I used 2 pieces of Tilapia to make the Ceviche. I’ll try shrimp next time and if I use any fish I’ll be sure to make sure that the seafood in it is at least half shrimp. I like the firmness and texture of shrimp versus fish.

Here’s how I made the ceviche:

I cut the fish into small pieces, put it in a big bowl and salted it. I juiced fresh limes over the fish until the lime juice covered the fish. I used a lime/lemon press thing (u can buy very inexpensive at a latin grocery store) to press the limes. I covered the fish and put it in the fridge overnight. The next day, I drained off the lime juice and added about 16 – 20 ounces of unsweetened pure coconut water.

I sliced some fresh ginger 8 – 10 thin peels and/or pieces combined, half a small cucumber, 1/3 of a red onion, and 2-3 mexican onions, 1/2 of a large serrano chile minced, half of a large avocado sliced, some springs of broken up cilantro, and kernals of corn shaven off one cobb (do not overcook). It was suggested to me that the fresh ingredients should be added last (or upon serving). I concluded that this is good advice so that the veggies don’t continue “cooking” in the citrusy juice. It’s special plus if the veggies are bright, fresh, and on the crisp side while retaining quite a bit of their natural flavor (as opposed to a “marinated” flavor.

I served my ceviche with sweet potato corn chips.

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